Tuesday, February 23, 2010

Monday, February 22, 2010

Its All Politics

This is Rush Limbaugh. He is a very talented entertainer. He is very entertaining if politics entertains you or if the idea of entertainment entertains you. If you're a liberal person, you can enjoy Rush by seeing it all as an elaborate act, sort of a spoof. If you're conservative it won't be at all difficult to enjoy his show. Rush is the biggest central force in conservatism as human beings go. I don't think Liberals even have such a force to speak of. I guess maybe the whole entertainment industry, maybe. And I'm including News in that category.

This is Barak Obama. You know him. You love him or loved him or not at all. He's a good spokesman for the executive branch. He's tallish and lanky. He's got that uptown fade. He's got pants such that when he sits down and crosses his leg you can almost see how long his socks are.
This is Katie Couric. She's a big news lady that I haven't really seen yet. Shame on me, but Tv News is probly fake anyway. Here we see Katie with her chewing tobacco and turtle neck.

Friday, February 19, 2010

Thursday, February 18, 2010

Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Monday, February 15, 2010

Friday, February 12, 2010

The Ruler is My Friend

I'm gonna learn to draw in perspective. I must get use to using a ruler. This is a self portrait done using a straight edge for every line.

Thursday, February 11, 2010

Wednesday, February 10, 2010

Monday, February 8, 2010

Left and Right Brains and The Importance of Value in Drawing

Let the record show that I’m not qualified to tell anybody how to draw, in that the only professional art job I’ve held is that of a caricature artist for Kamans Art Shoppes. Once in a blue moon, I’ll get a caricature gig, and once in an even bluer moon, I’ll get a commission. I do, however, have some ideas about drawing, and they may not be new ideas but I can tell you how they make sense to me, so I if you’re someone who hath ears to hear and are able to learn that way, I got some thoughts for you.

But first, watch this video because its really really interesting and has to do with what I'm gonna talk about. Its about the separation between the left and right brain. Also, her voice is really funny, so its a win win.

This lesson is mostly for beginning artists, especially caricature artists. First off, there’re two types of drawing. There’s drawing with the left brain and drawing with the right brain. The more these two hemispheres cooperate, the better. The left brain uses drawing to build/construct. It makes stuff up. Here is me drawing mostly with my left brain.

The right brain responds directly to that which it sees. Here’s an example of me trying to draw mostly with my right brain.

Line is typically used to draw with the left brain. This may be because the left brain thinks linearly. It plans out a path and takes that path. Just like a trip to the grocery. The left brain uses this line to establish shapes in a sorts, rather than to pick up milk and eggs, hit the ATM first and drop off library books on the way back.

The right brain cannot do this. The right brain doesn’t even choose what to draw, or how to draw it. It doesn't pick out important information. It doesn't prioritize. It only feels the pencil in the hand and responds directly to the visual stimuli before it.

What we see with our eyes is NEVER line. It is always value, darks and lights. Line is the left brain making sense of this. Drawing teachers will tell you to hold the pencil sideways or have you use charcoal and this is why. It helps force you to respond to those values rather than making stuff up.

The objective of pure observational drawing is to strengthen the connection between the hand, the eye, and the object being drawn.

With that in mind, look at this face.

The eye can be recreated fairly easy with line and so can the mouth, at least well enough to impress your grandma or your anime friends, but the nose and the mustache is a different story. This is because what we see when we look at this nose is relationships between soft and hard shadows. There's the dark of the nostril, the light of the ring shape at the end of the nose and everything in between. The outer edge of the nostril aka the nose parenthesis is slightly darker than the rest of the skin. Its lowest point is darker still, then it gets lighter as we head in toward the nostril which is so much a gradient shape that one really can't say where it begins and ends. My point is that the nose serves to prove to us that nothing really is made of line. This is, of course, the case with the eyes and mouth and everything else as well, but the nose makes this especially apparent.

Drawing faces from observation and relying on value is very good and also fun. When it comes time to make up a nose using only line, you will know more precisely what kind of object you are constructing and you will be much more comfortable.

That's my lesson, boys and girls. Thank you for reading and I would love it if you have any critique to offer with my wording or ideas.

Sunday, February 7, 2010

Wednesday, February 3, 2010

Tuesday, February 2, 2010


I drew Mel Gibson from my head during some down time at the job. I don't know. I feel him in there a little bit. What do you think? Chis Chua, I'm looking in your direction in particular. Do you think you can Gibson criticism?

This is based on Mercedes 560 SL that was sitting on the drive for a while. I believe I made it look much more beastly than it is. It's really a very elegant little machine.

Another drawing of Aida. I'm like how the cat part came out especially.